Found a Hedgehog?

Emergency Guidelines

 

If you find an ill or injured hedgehog it will probably be suffering from hypothermia, even in summer

Never try and force feed a hedgehog. The danger is the fluid/food will be inhaled

Place it on a hot (but not boiling hot) water bottle wrapped in a towel and put in a cardboard box or recycle box lined with newspaper, cover the box in a blanket, place in a quiet place to warm up and phone us immediately

Hedgehogs that need help are:

Orphaned hoglets - found out of the nest in day, the nest has been destroyed or the mother killed/injured

Injured hedgehogs - with open wounds, fractures, bites, burns, or trapped in some way.

Sick hedgehogs - usually found out in the day, thin, dehydrated, possibly poisoned, or with breathing problems. Hedgehogs that are unsteady on their feet (wobbling, rocking) or with flies around them.

Autumn juveniles - young hedgehogs born late in the year, if found out in the day, please contact us ASAP, please do not attempt to look after them yourselves as they will need medical help. 

Autumn Juveniles if out at night need to be monitored depending on the local weather conditions, They will not start to hibernate until we are getting regular frosts and night temperatures are consistently below 5 degrees. hedgehogs can survive hibernation at 450g, so while the weather remains mild young hedgehogs can be left. Support feeding them with meaty cat food / cat biscuits will help them to gain weight.

If you have any concerns about a small hedgehog during the colder months please contact your local rescue for advice.

Please avoid picking up hedgehogs and weighing them during the colder months if they are larger than a grapefruit. The stress caused in picking them up is huge.        

   

 Hedgehogs that should be left alone

Healthy hedgehogs will often rouse from hibernation for short periods even in cold winter weather. Do not assume these hedgehogs need help unless they are underweight or obviously unwell.

Adult females in summer that are uninjured but found out in daylight may be nursing mothers. Any large uninjured hedgehogs found at night (e.g. in winter or in the road) and picked up should be put back away from the road but near where found.